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EDITORIAL BOARD

2012

REGENERATION OF PLANTS IN EMS TREATED LOCAL MUNG BEAN (VIGNA RADIATE L. WILCZEK) UNDER SALT STRESS

By Muhammad Rafiq, Mahadev Mali, S. H. Ahmad Naqvi, M. Umar Dahot, Hafiza Faiza and Arsala Khatari

VOL-9 NO-(2)

Abstract

The regeneration of EMS treated seeds of two local varieties of mung bean was investigated under salt stress conditions. Three explants e.i. cotyledon, leaf and shoot apical meristem of mung bean obtained from in vitro grown EMS treated seeds of varieties NM-92 and Khalood were inoculated on MS medium containing various concentrations of 2, 4-D and BAP and IBA. The highest callus proliferation (98.3%) was obtained in EMS treated leaf of NM-92 followed by 96.5% in shoots of NM-92 control on MS medium supplemented with 1.8ÁM 2, 4-D and 3.56ÁM BAP. The increase in callus fresh weight was higher in leaf explants of both treated varieties. Similarly 57.3▒1.3 callus cultures of treated leaf explants of NM-92 were survived on media containing 50mM NaCl. Similarly the highest regeneration (65.5▒2.1%) was observed in NaCl selected callus cultures raised from shoots of EMS treated seeds.

DETECTION OF BANANA BUNCHY TOP VIRUS IN VIRUS-INFECTED PLANTS USING POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

By Sadik, A.S.1,2,3 , El-Afifi Sohair I.1 , Harding, R.M.2 , Dale, J.L.2 and Allam, E.K.1

VOL-9 NO-(2)

Abstract

Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the detection of Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) at maximum after 210 min and at minimum after 90 min using Pc-1 and Pc-2, respectively. PCR detection of BBTV in crude sap indicated that the freezing of banana tissue in liquid nitrogen (LN2) before extraction was more effective than using sand as the extraction technique. BBTV was also detected using PCR assay in 69 healthy and diseased plants using Na-PO4 buffer containing 1 % SDS. PCR detection of BBTV in nucleic acid extracts using seven different extraction buffers to adapt the use of PCR in routine detection in the field was studied. Results proved that BBTV was detected with high sensitivity in nucleic acid extracts more than in infectious sap. The results also suggested the common aetiology for the BBTV by the PCR reactions of BBTV in nucleic acid extracts from Australia, Burundi, Egypt, France, Gabon, Philippines and Taiwan. Results also proved a positive relation between the Egyptian-BBTV isolate and abaca bunchy top isolate from the Philippines, but there no relation was found with the Cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (CMV) isolates from Egypt and Philippines and Banana bract mosaic virus (BBMV) were found.

STREPTOMYCES SPECIES ABLE TO UTILIZE SOME HERBICIDES AS NITROGEN AND CARBON SOURCES

By Zaki M.M.1 , E.A. Saleh1 , A. Rahal2 and Sonya H. Mohamed2,3

VOL-9 NO-(2)

Abstract

The present work was designed to isolate and identify some actinomycetes able to degrade Basta (glufosinate) and Sencor (metribuzin) herbicides, which are widely used for weed control in Egypt. Results showed that 100 isolates of actinomycetes were isolated and purified from the rhizosphere soils of 11 different crops (barley, broad bean, clover, cotton, corn, grape, cantaloupe, pepper, sesame, tomato and wheat) treated with pesticides. The tolerance of the actinomycete isolates for Basta and Sencor herbicides were determined. Results showed that, 70 out of the 100 actinomycete isolates were able to grow on the recommended dose of Sencor (0.75 g/L) but 24 out of them were showed a good growth on the ten folds of the recommended dose of Sencor (7.5 g/L). At the same time, 38 actinomycete isolates grew on the recommended dose of Basta (2 g/L) and 18 of them appeared a moderate growth on 20 g/L of Basta herbicides. In addition, the ability of the 70 isolates to utilize the Sencor as carbon and/or nitrogen source was studied. Results showed that, 9 out of 70 actinomycete isolates gave a good growth on the starch nitrate agar medium containing the Sencor as a sole nitrogen source, while no isolates were found to be able to grow on the same medium with the Sencor as a sole carbon source.In this study, 5 isolates were biologically identified and found to be strains of Streptomyces rectiviolaceus, S.roseolus, S.albosporeus subsp abilomycaticus, S. herbaricolor and S. aureomonopodiales.

BIODEGRADATION OF SENCOR HERBICIDE BY SOME TREPTOMYCETES IN LIQUID CULTURE

By Sonya H. Mohamed1 , A. Rahal1 ; Zaki M.M.2 ; E.A.Saleh2 and A.S. Sadik2,3

VOL-9 NO-(2)

Abstract

This work was designed to study the role of streptomycetes in the biodegradation of Sencor herbicide and its persistence in liquid culture. Testing the biodegradation abilities of nine isolates of Streptomyces in vitro revealed that they differed greatly in the number of degradation-products produced from Sencor. Gas liquid chromatographic analysis revealed that all tested isolates began to degrade Sencor after 15 days from incubation. Number of compounds varied from one to five depending upon the isolate used, as the streptomycete isolates varied greatly in their abilities to degrade Sencor as indexed by the number of compounds produced from Sencor degradation. The products of Sencor degradation were more demonstrated after 30 and 45 days from incubation. Half life period of the herbicide was reached after 15 days in S. aureomonopodiales and mixture treatments, while was reached in the other treatments after 30 days. The present results could be considered as an additional prove for the in-vitro abilities of these streptomycete isolates to degrade and utilize Sencor as a sole nitrogen source in culture medium.

Acknowledgment of Reviewers

The Editor, Pak. J. Biotechnol. is very grateful to the following scientists who dedicated their considerable time and expertise to the journal by serving as reviewers from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 for Vol. 9 No. 1 and 2, 2012.
Prof. Dr. Alexandre SemenovMoscow, Russia
Prof. Dr. Atef S. SadikTaif, Saudi Arabia
Prof. Dr. Sher Muhammed MangrioUni. Of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan
Prof. Dr. Jian He XuShanghai, China
Prof. Dr. Muhammed Umar Dahot Uni. Of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan
Dr. S. A. Anitha ChristyHouston, USA
Dr. Mostafa RahimnejadUniv. Babool, Iran
Dr. Muhammed RafiqUni. Of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan
Dr. S. Habib Ahmed NaqviUni. Of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan